Tag Archives: virus

Product Brand Names for Aspirin

aspirintabletAlthough aspirin is an old drug, we often mistakenly take its safety for granted; it can be a dangerous drug, especially for children.

You might be surprised at the number of medications that contain aspirin (salicylates).  To assist you in recognizing some of the medications that contain aspirin, we have provided some lists below.  These are all basic guides, and you must always read the labels.   And, of course, these products are not to be used with children under the age of 19! 

As with most medications, whether they be prescription or over the counter, you want to be careful that you are not ‘double-dosing’  because the recommended dosages are already just below the toxic level to human beings.

Aspirin Brand Names:

  • Acuprin®
  • Anacin® Aspirin Regimen
  • Ascriptin®
  • Aspergum®
  • Aspidrox®medicine_cabinet
  • Aspir-Mox®
  • Aspirtab®
  • Aspir-trin®
  • Bayer® Aspirin
  • Bufferin®
  • Buffex®
  • Easprin®
  • Ecotrin®
  • Empirin®
  • Entaprin®
  • Entercote®
  • Fasprin®
  • Genacote®
  • Gennin-FC®
  • Genprin®
  • Halfprin®
  • Magnaprin®
  • Miniprin®
  • Minitabs®
  • Ridiprin®
  • Sloprin®
  • Uni-Buff®
  • Uni-Tren®
  • Valomag®
  • Zorprin®

Brand names of combination products

  • Alka-Seltzer® (containing Aspirin, Citric Acid, Sodium Bicarbonate)
  • Alka-Seltzer® Extra Strength (containing Aspirin, Citric Acid, Sodium Bicarbonate)
  • Alka-Seltzer® Morning Relief (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Alka-Seltzer® Plus Flu (containing Aspirin, Chlorpheniramine, Dextromethorphan)
  • Alka-Seltzer® PM (containing Aspirin, Diphenhydramine)
  • Alor® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Anacin® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Anacin® Advanced Headache Formula (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Aspircaf® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Axotal® (containing Aspirin, Butalbital)
  • Azdone® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Bayer® Aspirin Plus Calcium (containing Aspirin, Calcium Carbonate)
  • Bayer® Aspirin PM (containing Aspirin, Diphenhydramine)
  • Bayer® Back and Body Pain (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • BC Headache (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • BC Powder (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Damason-P® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Emagrin® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Endodan® (containing Aspirin, Oxycodone)
  • Equagesic® (containing Aspirin, Meprobamate)
  • Excedrin® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Excedrin® Back & Body (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin)
  • Goody’s® Body Pain (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin)
  • Levacet® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Lortab® ASA (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Micrainin® (containing Aspirin, Meprobamate)
  • Momentum® (containing Aspirin, Phenyltoloxamine)
  • Norgesic® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Orphenadrine)
  • Orphengesic® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Orphenadrine)
  • Panasal® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Percodan® (containing Aspirin, Oxycodone)
  • Robaxisal® (containing Aspirin, Methocarbamol)
  • Roxiprin® (containing Aspirin, Oxycodone)
  • Saleto® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Soma® Compound (containing Aspirin, Carisoprodol)
  • Soma® Compound with Codeine (containing Aspirin, Carisoprodol, Codeine)
  • Supac® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Synalgos-DC® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Dihydrocodeine)
  • Talwin® Compound (containing Aspirin, Pentazocine)
  • Vanquish® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • TIP: It is important to keep a written list of all of any prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements, because many of these contain salicylates, too. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Other Over The Counter Medications that Contain Aspirin:

  • Kaopectate
  • Maalox
  • PamprinNo Aspirin Products for Children!
  • Pepto-Bismol
  • Vanquish
  • Alka-Seltzer
  • Doan’s

For lists of aspirin containing products, both prescription and over the counter, go to the Reye’s Syndrome website by clicking here.

Symptoms of aspirin overdose may include:

  • burning pain in the throat or stomach
  • vomiting
  • decreased urination
  • fever
  • restlessness
  • irritability
  • talking a lot and saying things that do not make sense
  • fear or nervousness
  • dizziness
  • double vision
  • uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body
  • confusion
  • abnormally excited mood
  • hallucination (seeing things or hearing voices that are not there)
  • seizures
  • drowsiness
  • loss of consciousness for a period of time
Symptoms for Reye’s Syndrome include:
Stage I Symptoms Stage II Symptoms Stage III Symptoms Stage IV Symptoms
Persistent or continuous vomiting
Signs of brain dysfunction:
Listlessness
Loss of pep and energy
Drowsiness
Personality changes:
Irritability
Aggressive behavior
Disorientation:
Confusion
Irrational behavior
Combative
Delirium
Convulsions
Coma

NOTE: The symptoms of Reye’s Syndrome in infants do not follow a typical pattern. For example, vomiting may be replaced with diarrhea and infants may display irregular breathing.

Suspect Reye’s in an Infant with:

  • * Diarrhea, but not necessarily vomiting
    * Respiratory disturbances such as hyperventilation or apneic episodes, seizures and hypoglycemia are common
    * Elevated SGOT-SGPT (SAT-ACT) [usually 200 or more units] in the absence of jaundice
Reye’s Syndrome should be suspected in a person if this pattern of symptoms appear during, or most commonly, after a viral illness. Not all of the symptoms have to occur, nor do they have to be displayed in this order. Fever is not usually present. Many diseases have symptoms in common. Physicians and medical staff in emergency rooms who have not had experience in treating Reye’s Syndrome may misdiagnose the disease.
The NRSF has compiled an enormous amount of aspirin information, including non-aspirin products, and aspirin products, in lists in an Android app available in the google play store:  Aspirin Sense and Sensitivity.
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Shingles; The Varicella Zoster Virus

Shinglesshingles

Almost 1 out of every 3 people in the United States will develop shingles, also known as zoster or herpes zoster. There are an estimated 1 million cases each year in the United States. Anyone who has had the chickenpox may develop shingles; even children can get shingles. The risk of the disease increases as a person gets older. About half of all cases occur among men and women 60 years old or older.  There are many reports, however, of shingles showing up in children and in the 20 year old to 40 year old range.

People who have medical conditions that keep their immune systems from working properly, such as certain cancers, including leukemia and lymphoma, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and people who receive immunosuppressive drugs, such as steroids and drugs given after organ transplantation, are also at greater risk of getting shingles.

People who develop shingles typically have only one episode in their lifetime. In some cases, however, a person can have a second or even a third episode.

Shingles is caused by the varicella zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. After a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus stays in the body in a dormant (inactive) state. For reasons that are not fully known, the virus can reactivate years later, causing shingles. Herpes zoster is not caused by the same virus that causes genital herpes, a sexually transmitted disease.

Shingles usually starts as a painful rash on one side of the face or body. The rash forms blisters that typically scab over in 7–10 days and clears up within 2–4 weeks.

Before the rash develops, there is often pain, itching, or tingling in the area where the rash will develop. This may happen anywhere from 1 to 5 days before the rash appears.

Most commonly, the rash occurs in a single stripe around either the left or the right side of the body. In other cases, the rash occurs on one side of the face. In rare cases (usually among people with weakened immune systems), the rash may be more widespread and look similar to a chickenpox rash. Shingles can affect the eye and cause loss of vision.

  • Other symptoms of shingles can include:
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Chills
  • Upset stomach

Shingles cannot be passed from one person to another. However, the virus that causes shingles, the varicella zoster virus, can be spread from a person with active shingles to a person who has never had chickenpox. In such cases, the person exposed to the virus might develop chickenpox, but they would not develop shingles.

The virus is spread through direct contact with fluid from the rash blisters, not through sneezing, coughing or casual contact.

A person with shingles can spread the virus when the rash is in the blister-phase. A person is not infectious before blisters appear. Once the rash has developed crusts, the person is no longer contagious.

Shingles is less contagious than chickenpox and the risk of a person with shingles spreading the virus is low if the rash is covered.

  • If you have shingles:
  • Keep the rash covered.
  • Do not touch or scratch the rash.
  • Wash your hands often to prevent the spread of varicella zoster virus.
  • Until your rash has developed crusts, avoid contact with pregnant women who have never had chickenpox or the varicella vaccine; premature or low birth weight infants; and immunocompromised persons (such as persons receiving immunosuppressive medications or undergoing chemotherapy, organ transplant recipients, and people with HIV infection).

The most common complication of shingles is a condition called postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). People with PHN have severe pain in the areas where they had the shingles rash, even after the rash clears up.

The pain from PHN may be severe and debilitating, but it usually resolves in a few weeks or months in most patients. PHN can, however, persists for many years in some persons.

As people get older, they are more likely to develop PHN, and the pain is more likely to be severe. PHN occurs rarely among people under 40 years of age but can occur in up to half (and possibly more) of untreated people who are 60 years of age and older.

Shingles may lead to serious complications involving the eye. Very rarely, shingles can also lead to pneumonia, hearing problems, blindness, brain inflammation (encephalitis) or death.

Several antiviral medicines—acyclovir, valacyclovir, and famciclovir—are available to treat shingles. These medicines will help shorten the length and severity of the illness. But to be effective, they must be started as soon as possible after the rash appears. Thus, people who have or think they might have shingles should call their healthcare provider as soon as possible to discuss treatment options.

Analgesics (pain medicine) may help relieve the pain caused by shingles. Wet compresses, calamine lotion, and colloidal oatmeal baths may help relieve some of the itching.

The only way to reduce the risk of developing shingles and the long-term pain that can follow shingles is to get vaccinated. A vaccine for shingles is licensed for persons aged 60 years and older.

The shingles vaccine (Zostavax®) was recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) in 2006 to reduce the risk of shingles and its associated pain in people age 60 years and older.

Your risk for developing shingles increases as you age. The Shingles Prevention Study involved individuals age 60 years and older and found the shingles vaccine significantly reduced disease in this age group. The vaccine is currently recommended for persons 60 years of age and older. Even people who have had shingles can receive the vaccine to help prevent future occurrences of the disease.

Shingles vaccine is available in pharmacies and doctor’s offices. Talk with your healthcare professional if you have questions about shingles vaccine.

At this time, CDC does not have a recommendation for routine use of shingles vaccine in persons 50 through 59 years old. However, the vaccine is approved by FDA for people in this age group.

Some people should NOT get shingles vaccine.

  • A person who has ever had a life-threatening or severe allergic reaction to gelatin, the antibiotic neomycin, or any other component of shingles vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • A person who has a weakened immune system because of HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system, treatment with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids, cancer treatment such as radiation or chemotherapy, cancer affecting the bone marrow or lymphatic system, such as leukemia or lymphoma.
  • Women who are or might be pregnant

Some people who get the shingles vaccine will develop a chickenpox-like rash near the place where they were vaccinated.  As a precaution, this rash should be covered until it disappears.

The shingles vaccine does not contain thimerosal (a preservative containing mercury).

What are the risks from shingles vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, could possibly cause serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. However, the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

No serious problems have been identified with shingles vaccine.

Mild Problems:

Redness, soreness, swelling, or itching at the site of the injection (about 1 person in 3).
Headache (about 1 person in 70).

Like all vaccines, shingles vaccine is being closely monitored for unusual or severe problems.

What about taking aspirin during a Shingles episode? We don’t know yet, but we are monitoring this closely and will keep you updated.  Never give a child aspirin during a shingles episode, as shingles is a dormant chickenpox virus!

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Joshua’s Story

joshuaMy son, Joshua, a sophomore at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts died from the complications of Reye’s Syndrome in 1994… he was 19 years old.  At the time his illness began, he was a healthy six-foot college sophomore, happy with his life and the college of his dreams.  He was growing into a wonderful young man and excelled in his course studies at the college he loved.

He called me one snowy day to say he was not feeling well. He asked me what he should do. I advised him to go to Student Health and call me right after his appointment. The doctor said he had the flu. Based on the symptoms he described, I told him he should come home and we would see our family doctor. It seemed to me he had Mono. He came home and saw our family doctor who confirmed that he did indeed have Mono.

The treatment was simple…get plenty of rest and drink lots of liquids. The problem was that as the days progressed, he continued to get sicker. We went back to see the doctor every day for several days. Then he was admitted to the hospital, discharged and admitted again. Still he was no better.

He was admitted once again and this time he was critical. Our doctor either thought there was nothing to worry about or he didn’t know what he was dealing with. Josh had test after test and still there were no answers.

Finally, Joshua was transferred to another hospital… the last time Joshua spoke was in the ambulance. When we arrived at the hospital we were met by a team of doctors and while taking him to intensive care they requested a signed consent form for a liver transplant. Every possible test was done, and finally the diagnosis of Reye’s Syndrome was made.

Doctors put Joshua into a drug induced coma, and on life support. He continued to get worse and on March 4th, he suffered brain death. On March 5th we disconnected life support and he stopped breathing immediately. His death occurred 2 weeks after he was diagnosed with the flu and one week after being admitted to the medical center.

Joshua’s Mom states;

“I strongly believe education is the best prevention. I know I was aware of not giving aspirin to children with viral infection, but I didn’t consider the over the counter medications we all take may contain aspirin.

“Since Joshua’s death, the hospital has instituted a protocol for Reye’s Syndrome because they did not know what they were dealing with in Joshua’s illness.

“There were a combination of issues that played a role in Joshua’s death from Reye’s Syndrome. Our trusted doctor did not take Joshua’s illness seriously, and the other doctors who treated Joshua ran tests but didn’t know what they were dealing with.  When Joshua was admitted to the hospital for the last time our physician went to a medical convention out of state. He called me when he returned to ask about my son. It was too late, Joshua had died.

“It is my strongest belief that parents, doctors and hospitals need to be educated about Reye’s Syndrome. I am finally able to write about this 13 years after his death and would like to offer my assistance in helping to accomplish this important goal.”

Let Joshua’s Story be a learning experience, one that keeps our young people alive and safe from the threat of Reye’s Syndrome. So tell them Why…. tell them about Aspirin and about the products that contain aspirin (salicylates). Teach them to read the labels.

Tell them about Reye’s…. they can pass the word to their friends who offer them an aspirin, alka-seltzer, or pamprin, pepto-bismol or muscle creams that contain salicylates.

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What To Do After Giving Your Child Aspirin

What To Do After Giving a Child Aspirin

3 phone calls within 30 minutes from moms who did not know about the aspirin – Reye’s Syndrome link.  All 3 moms inNo Aspirin Products for Children!  tears.  All 3 moms thinking they have seriously endangered their child’s life.

One mom, of a seven year old, asked her office co-workers if they knew of the danger of Reye’s and aspirin (salicylates). Half! yes, half! of her co-workers were unaware that aspirin products could trigger Reye’s Syndrome.  Half had never heard of Reye’s Syndrome!

This is very scary! The children of the half who were unaware of Reye’s are at terrible risk.

One mom stated that her mother told her “she always use to give her and her siblings aspirin, those little orange chew-ables , and that it never did any harm to any of them.”  They were lucky. Very lucky. Many other families lost children to those little orange chewable “baby” aspirins.

There is no cure for Reye’s. There is no test that can be run to determine if a child is susceptible to Reye’s after ingesting aspirin products.

The only thing a parent can do after giving their child aspirin is watch for Reye’s symptoms.

Symptoms usually show up AFTER the child begins to feel better, goes back to school, and begins to return to a normal everyday routine. They will be their normal selves, and then:

Vomiting is where it begins. The kind that hits hard and fast, without warning.
     This is the first Red Flag.
At the second or third bout of this vomiting, the child should be taken to the emergency room – preferably an emergency room at a children’s hospital.

Then, loss of energy – loss of pep. They will feel lethargic, not interested in playing.
Combine this with the vomiting, and you have a stronger case for Reye’s.

They will want to sleep a lot. They will be difficult to wake up.
They may lose some motor skills; be unsteady on their feet, walk into walls, not recognize where they are, be confused.
At this point, it is -absolutely- critical the child get to an emergency room where a diagnosis of Reye’s can be made.

They may become combative – not want you to touch them, or strike out at anything near them.
At this point, it is imperative the child be admitted to ICU and Reye’s Treatment begun.

Coma is the last phase.

The worst thing about Reye’s is that once Reye’s is triggered, there is little time. The faster the diagnosis of Reye’s can be made, and the treatment for Reye’s begun, the better the child has of surviving.

Most doctors will not think about Reye’s as a first diagnosis. Many of them have not seen a case of Reye’s. They will diagnose the problem as gastroenteritis, or meningitis, and many parents will be asked if the child is on drugs.

You, as a parent, will have to –insist– that your doctor test for, and rule out, Reye’s.

Most doctors think Reye’s has disappeared. We are here to tell you, sadly, it has not, and we receive case reports throughout the year.

If your doctor is unsure, and wants medical support from one of our specialists, all they have to do is call the Foundation at 800.233.7393  and we will put them in touch with one of our knowledgeable doctors.

We tell parents and caregivers; Reye’s is rare;  just watch for symptoms for about 10 days after the child begins to feel better. If symptoms appear, act quickly. We are more than happy to answer any and all questions, too.  Don’t hesitate to call or email us with your concerns. We are here to educate and support you.

Yes, Reye’s is rare, but it has not gone away. If Reye’s was gone, the Foundation’s mission would be accomplished and we would have dissolved.  We are still here because Reye’s is still here, and there are still parents and caregivers who do not know about Reye’s. The only way we can eradicate this horrible child killing disease is through education and awareness.

Save a child’s life, and a family unnecessary trauma and horrific loss, by spreading the word: Kids and Aspirin Products DON’T Mix!

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Spring 2012

Spring 2012: Message From The NRSF President

johnAlready, this year is shaping up to be a busy year as we extend our Reye’s Syndrome education and awareness outreach.

This year, we are asking families to come together in support of Reye’s Syndrome awareness.  We are asking the older generations to impart their knowledge to the younger generations, and we invite those younger generations to become active in supporting Reye’s Syndrome education and awareness.  Until we find a cure for Reye’s Syndrome, we must continue putting the message out; Kids and aspirin products don’t mix!  We must hand Reye’s Syndrome awareness down from generation to generation until we find a cure!

The uniqueness of the National Reye’s Syndrome Foundation is that all involved  are family.  My wife, Terri, and I have met most of you, and your families, at annual meetings, at hospital bedsides, at chapter gatherings, and at various fund raising events over the years.  The Foundation itself is one big family, with one single goal in mind; the eradication of a monstrous disease!  We don’t have hundreds of thousands of members, or donors.  We know each of you by name, and the name of your loved one attacked by Reye’s Syndrome.  You are not a stranger, you are family.

In today’s electronic world, it is easier than ever to stay in touch, and it is easier than ever to create support for Reye’s Syndrome education and awareness.

How simple it is to ask your boss if every  Friday, or every third Friday of the month be designated a Reye’s Syndrome Awareness Friday, and perhaps a ‘dress down day’, or potluck can be held with proceeds donated to the NRSF in support of educational programs.  Or maybe one sports game at school each year can be dedicated to Reye’s Syndrome Awareness and ticket proceeds  donated to the NRSF for educational programs.  And, for all those who have ‘friends’ on Facebook and other social media sites, creating a Birthday Wish Cause, or Memorial, with the NRSF as recipient of the gift, is a wonderful and so easy way to support Reye’s Syndrome Awareness.  It also helps the NRSF family grow stronger in outreach programs.

We are in this together, you and I.  We are partners in a common cause.   baby1

We are guardians of children past, present and future, and we shall not let them down.

Join the NRSF family in this most important cause.

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Other Names For Aspirin

Always check the label, or ask your pharmacist, if a prescription or over the counter drug contains salicylates (aspirin), before giving it to a child under the age of 19.

Here is a list of other names for aspirin (salicylates):other_names_for_aspirin_list

Acetyl Salicylic Acid
Acetylsalicylate
Acetylsalicylic Acid
Aluminum Acetyl Salicylate
Ammonium Salicylate
Amyl Salicylate
Arthropan
Aspirin
Benzyl Salicylate
Butyloctyl Salicylate
Calcium Acetyl Salicylate
Choline Salicylate
Ethyl Salicylate
Lithium Salicylate
Methyl Salicylate
Methylene Disalicylic Acid
Octisalate
Octyl Salicylate
Phenyl Salicylate
Procaine Salicylate
Sal Ethyl Carbonate
Salicylamide
Salicylanilide
Salicylsalicylic Acid
Santalyl Salicylate
Sodium Salicylate
Stoncylate
Strontium Salicylate
Sulfosalicylic Acid
Tridecyl Salicylate
Trolamine Salicylate

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