Tag Archives: death

Grapefruit, Drug Interactions

Don’t take this with that! Seriesgrapefruit

Grapefruit causes problems when taken with certain medications

Sometimes the juice just isn’t worth the squeeze…especially when combining grapefruit with medicines.

While it can be part of a balanced and nutritious diet, grapefruit can have serious consequences when taken with certain medications. Currently, there are more than fifty prescription and over-the-counter drugs known to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that can have negative interactions with grapefruit.

As little as one cup of juice or two grapefruit wedges can alter the way your medicines work. When taken with medicine, grapefruit can delay, decrease, or enhance absorption of certain drugs; as a result, the patient does not receive the prescribed dosage of the medication. If the label on your medicine reads “DO NOT TAKE WITH GRAPEFRUIT” or has similar words, heed the warning. It can save you a bushel of problems.

How it does or doesn’t work

pills

Depending on the active ingredient, grapefruit can reduce the effectiveness of a drug or worse, create potentially dangerous drug levels in the body. Grapefruit can interfere with transporters in the intestine that help absorb drugs. When this happens, less of the drug reaches the bloodstream and the patient receives no benefit.

Grapefruit can also interfere with enzymes that break down drugs in your digestive system. This can result in the body absorbing too much of the drug, which can potentially cause serious problems.

Help may be on the way

Scientists are currently working on breeding hybrid grapefruits that will be safe to mix with medications. In the near future you may be able to enjoy these tasty mounds without compromising your safety. But until the new fruit containers start to arrive, follow these tips:

  • Ask your pharmacist or other health care professional if you can have fresh grapefruit or grapefruit juice while using your medication. If you can’t, you may want to ask if you can have other juices with the medicine.
  • Read the Medication Guide or patient information sheet that comes with your prescription medicine to see if it interacts with grapefruit juice. Some information may advise not to take the drug with grapefruit juice. If it’s OK to have grapefruit juice, there will be no mention of it in the guide or information sheet.
  • Read the Drug Facts label on your non-prescription medicine, which will let you know if you can have grapefruit or other fruit juices with it.
  • If you can’t have grapefruit juice with your medicine, check the label of bottles of fruit juice or drinks flavored with fruit juice to make sure they don’t contain grapefruit juice.
  • Seville oranges (often used to make orange marmalade) and tangelos (a cross between tangerines and grapefruit) affect the same enzyme as grapefruit juice, so avoid these fruits as well if your medicine interacts with grapefruit juice.

Like this information?

donate_baby_angel

Click to Donate and Educate

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Don't Take This With That:, Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise....

Product Brand Names for Aspirin

aspirintabletAlthough aspirin is an old drug, we often mistakenly take its safety for granted; it can be a dangerous drug, especially for children.

You might be surprised at the number of medications that contain aspirin (salicylates).  To assist you in recognizing some of the medications that contain aspirin, we have provided some lists below.  These are all basic guides, and you must always read the labels.   And, of course, these products are not to be used with children under the age of 19! 

As with most medications, whether they be prescription or over the counter, you want to be careful that you are not ‘double-dosing’  because the recommended dosages are already just below the toxic level to human beings.

Aspirin Brand Names:

  • Acuprin®
  • Anacin® Aspirin Regimen
  • Ascriptin®
  • Aspergum®
  • Aspidrox®medicine_cabinet
  • Aspir-Mox®
  • Aspirtab®
  • Aspir-trin®
  • Bayer® Aspirin
  • Bufferin®
  • Buffex®
  • Easprin®
  • Ecotrin®
  • Empirin®
  • Entaprin®
  • Entercote®
  • Fasprin®
  • Genacote®
  • Gennin-FC®
  • Genprin®
  • Halfprin®
  • Magnaprin®
  • Miniprin®
  • Minitabs®
  • Ridiprin®
  • Sloprin®
  • Uni-Buff®
  • Uni-Tren®
  • Valomag®
  • Zorprin®

Brand names of combination products

  • Alka-Seltzer® (containing Aspirin, Citric Acid, Sodium Bicarbonate)
  • Alka-Seltzer® Extra Strength (containing Aspirin, Citric Acid, Sodium Bicarbonate)
  • Alka-Seltzer® Morning Relief (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Alka-Seltzer® Plus Flu (containing Aspirin, Chlorpheniramine, Dextromethorphan)
  • Alka-Seltzer® PM (containing Aspirin, Diphenhydramine)
  • Alor® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Anacin® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Anacin® Advanced Headache Formula (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Aspircaf® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Axotal® (containing Aspirin, Butalbital)
  • Azdone® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Bayer® Aspirin Plus Calcium (containing Aspirin, Calcium Carbonate)
  • Bayer® Aspirin PM (containing Aspirin, Diphenhydramine)
  • Bayer® Back and Body Pain (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • BC Headache (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • BC Powder (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Damason-P® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Emagrin® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Endodan® (containing Aspirin, Oxycodone)
  • Equagesic® (containing Aspirin, Meprobamate)
  • Excedrin® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Excedrin® Back & Body (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin)
  • Goody’s® Body Pain (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin)
  • Levacet® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Lortab® ASA (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Micrainin® (containing Aspirin, Meprobamate)
  • Momentum® (containing Aspirin, Phenyltoloxamine)
  • Norgesic® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Orphenadrine)
  • Orphengesic® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Orphenadrine)
  • Panasal® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Percodan® (containing Aspirin, Oxycodone)
  • Robaxisal® (containing Aspirin, Methocarbamol)
  • Roxiprin® (containing Aspirin, Oxycodone)
  • Saleto® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Soma® Compound (containing Aspirin, Carisoprodol)
  • Soma® Compound with Codeine (containing Aspirin, Carisoprodol, Codeine)
  • Supac® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Synalgos-DC® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Dihydrocodeine)
  • Talwin® Compound (containing Aspirin, Pentazocine)
  • Vanquish® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • TIP: It is important to keep a written list of all of any prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements, because many of these contain salicylates, too. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Other Over The Counter Medications that Contain Aspirin:

  • Kaopectate
  • Maalox
  • PamprinNo Aspirin Products for Children!
  • Pepto-Bismol
  • Vanquish
  • Alka-Seltzer
  • Doan’s

For lists of aspirin containing products, both prescription and over the counter, go to the Reye’s Syndrome website by clicking here.

Symptoms of aspirin overdose may include:

  • burning pain in the throat or stomach
  • vomiting
  • decreased urination
  • fever
  • restlessness
  • irritability
  • talking a lot and saying things that do not make sense
  • fear or nervousness
  • dizziness
  • double vision
  • uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body
  • confusion
  • abnormally excited mood
  • hallucination (seeing things or hearing voices that are not there)
  • seizures
  • drowsiness
  • loss of consciousness for a period of time
Symptoms for Reye’s Syndrome include:
Stage I Symptoms Stage II Symptoms Stage III Symptoms Stage IV Symptoms
Persistent or continuous vomiting
Signs of brain dysfunction:
Listlessness
Loss of pep and energy
Drowsiness
Personality changes:
Irritability
Aggressive behavior
Disorientation:
Confusion
Irrational behavior
Combative
Delirium
Convulsions
Coma

NOTE: The symptoms of Reye’s Syndrome in infants do not follow a typical pattern. For example, vomiting may be replaced with diarrhea and infants may display irregular breathing.

Suspect Reye’s in an Infant with:

  • * Diarrhea, but not necessarily vomiting
    * Respiratory disturbances such as hyperventilation or apneic episodes, seizures and hypoglycemia are common
    * Elevated SGOT-SGPT (SAT-ACT) [usually 200 or more units] in the absence of jaundice
Reye’s Syndrome should be suspected in a person if this pattern of symptoms appear during, or most commonly, after a viral illness. Not all of the symptoms have to occur, nor do they have to be displayed in this order. Fever is not usually present. Many diseases have symptoms in common. Physicians and medical staff in emergency rooms who have not had experience in treating Reye’s Syndrome may misdiagnose the disease.
The NRSF has compiled an enormous amount of aspirin information, including non-aspirin products, and aspirin products, in lists in an Android app available in the google play store:  Aspirin Sense and Sensitivity.

Leave a comment

Filed under Aspirin Containing Products

Joshua’s Story

joshuaMy son, Joshua, a sophomore at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts died from the complications of Reye’s Syndrome in 1994… he was 19 years old.  At the time his illness began, he was a healthy six-foot college sophomore, happy with his life and the college of his dreams.  He was growing into a wonderful young man and excelled in his course studies at the college he loved.

He called me one snowy day to say he was not feeling well. He asked me what he should do. I advised him to go to Student Health and call me right after his appointment. The doctor said he had the flu. Based on the symptoms he described, I told him he should come home and we would see our family doctor. It seemed to me he had Mono. He came home and saw our family doctor who confirmed that he did indeed have Mono.

The treatment was simple…get plenty of rest and drink lots of liquids. The problem was that as the days progressed, he continued to get sicker. We went back to see the doctor every day for several days. Then he was admitted to the hospital, discharged and admitted again. Still he was no better.

He was admitted once again and this time he was critical. Our doctor either thought there was nothing to worry about or he didn’t know what he was dealing with. Josh had test after test and still there were no answers.

Finally, Joshua was transferred to another hospital… the last time Joshua spoke was in the ambulance. When we arrived at the hospital we were met by a team of doctors and while taking him to intensive care they requested a signed consent form for a liver transplant. Every possible test was done, and finally the diagnosis of Reye’s Syndrome was made.

Doctors put Joshua into a drug induced coma, and on life support. He continued to get worse and on March 4th, he suffered brain death. On March 5th we disconnected life support and he stopped breathing immediately. His death occurred 2 weeks after he was diagnosed with the flu and one week after being admitted to the medical center.

Joshua’s Mom states;

“I strongly believe education is the best prevention. I know I was aware of not giving aspirin to children with viral infection, but I didn’t consider the over the counter medications we all take may contain aspirin.

“Since Joshua’s death, the hospital has instituted a protocol for Reye’s Syndrome because they did not know what they were dealing with in Joshua’s illness.

“There were a combination of issues that played a role in Joshua’s death from Reye’s Syndrome. Our trusted doctor did not take Joshua’s illness seriously, and the other doctors who treated Joshua ran tests but didn’t know what they were dealing with.  When Joshua was admitted to the hospital for the last time our physician went to a medical convention out of state. He called me when he returned to ask about my son. It was too late, Joshua had died.

“It is my strongest belief that parents, doctors and hospitals need to be educated about Reye’s Syndrome. I am finally able to write about this 13 years after his death and would like to offer my assistance in helping to accomplish this important goal.”

Let Joshua’s Story be a learning experience, one that keeps our young people alive and safe from the threat of Reye’s Syndrome. So tell them Why…. tell them about Aspirin and about the products that contain aspirin (salicylates). Teach them to read the labels.

Tell them about Reye’s…. they can pass the word to their friends who offer them an aspirin, alka-seltzer, or pamprin, pepto-bismol or muscle creams that contain salicylates.

Leave a comment

Filed under Joshua's Story

eBooks and Apps!

eBooks and Apps

To assist families, caregivers, and medical professionals, the NRSF has created several books and android apps:

  • Aspirin Sense and Sensitivity is an android app found in the google play store.  This app details everything one would want to know about aspirin; what drugs aspirin interferes with, who should and should not take aspirin, lists of products that do and do not contain salicylates (aspirin), and a handy list of ‘other’ ingredient names aspirin is known as.  This is a great app to have on hand when shopping for children’s medications, or for your own needs.
  • A Guide To Chickenpox is an app that assists parents and caregivers in managing children and chickenpox.  This app includes a detailed look at vaccinations, and also provides tools for parents for tracking the needs of their children.
  • Because You Need To Know is an eBook available in all eBook Stores on line, including Apple, Amazon, and Barnes and Nobles that teaches about Reye’s Syndrome.  This ebook can be downloaded in any format from the Smashwords ebook store, to be read on a computer or any ereader device.
  • Coping With Family Stress After Reye’s Syndrome is an eBook available in all eBook Stores on line, including Apple, Amazon, and Barnes and Nobles that helps families touched by the trauma of Reye’s Syndrome.  This ebook can be downloaded in any format from the Smashwords ebook store, to be read on a computer or any ereader device.
  • Coping With Family Stress After Chronic Illness or Death is an eBook available in all eBook Stores on line, including Apple, Amazon, and Barnes and Nobles that assists families through their grief.  This ebook can be downloaded in any format from the Smashwords ebook store, to be read on a computer or any ereader device.

We will keep you updated here as more ebooks and apps become available.

Leave a comment

Filed under eBooks and Apps - Oh My!