Tag Archives: chicken pox parties

September is Reye’s Syndrome Awareness Month!

Just in time for school, September of each year is designated as Reye’s Syndrome Awareness Month!

Just in time for Reye’s Syndrome Awareness Month, the National Reye’s Syndrome Foundation is offering some great tee’s in 3 fabulous colors to help spread the word that Kids and Aspirin Products Don’t Mix!

We hope you care enough about eradicating this child-killing disease to support our programs and help us get the word out by purchasing and wearing a “Be Wise About Reye’s” tee-shirt.  RS Awareness Month Tees

Tee’s on sale for $15.00 now include:

Ash  — Light Blue  — Bright Green

Tees can be ordered until August 20, 2013 so they can be shipped to you before September.

This is a crowd sourced awareness campaign and we have to sell at least a total of 10 tees in the color you choose in order to have them printed.  If you order a tee, and we don’t meet the goal of selling 10 tees in that color, you will not be charged and your tee will not be printed.  If you need more information about how this works, email the foundation at: nrsf(at)reyessyndrome(dot)org

We will take credit card orders over the phone also at: 800.233.7393

Join us in eliminating the incidence of this child-killing disease! Order Your Tee Today!!  It’s tax-deductible, too!

Thank You!

National Reye’s Syndrome Foundation
501(c)3 Charity – est. 1974
www.reyessyndrome.org

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Beware Fraudulent Flu Products

In the past week, FDA has sent an additional nine warning letters to firms marketing fraudulent flu products, including flufraudredflagan online firm marketing an “alternative to the flu shot,” a firm selling an oral spray online and in major retail stores, and three firms marketing dietary supplements online. (The latter three firms’ letters are co-signed by the Federal Trade Commission, which regulates the advertising of many consumer products.)

The remaining four warning letters were issued to online firms selling what they claim to be generic and other unapproved versions of oseltamivir phosphate (the active ingredient in Tamiflu). Tamiflu is an FDA-approved brand-name drug; no generic is approved in the U.S.

As the flu continues to make people sick—and even cause deaths—scammers are alive and well, promoting their fraudulent products to the unsuspecting public.

These scammers sell their products with claims to prevent, treat or cure the flu, even though they have not been tested and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved them.

FDA warns consumers to steer clear of fraudulent flu products, which can be found online and in retail stores and may include products marketed as dietary supplements or conventional foods, drugs, nasal sprays and devices.

“As any health threat emerges, fraudulent products appear almost overnight,” says Gary Coody, R.Ph., FDA’s national health fraud coordinator. “Right now, so-called ‘alternatives’ to the flu vaccine are big with scammers.”

“These unproven products give consumers a false sense of security,” says Mary Malarkey, director of FDA’s Office of Compliance and Biologics Quality. “There is no need to buy a product that claims to be an alternative to the vaccine. Flu vaccine is still available and it’s not too late to get vaccinated.”

Flu Fraud Red Flags!

These flu claims on an unapproved product indicate that it may be fraudulent:

  • reduces severity and length of flu
  • boosts your immunity naturally without a flu shot
  • safe and effective alternative to flu vaccine
  • prevents catching the flu
  • effective treatment for flu
  • faster recovery from flu
  • supports your body’s natural immune defenses to fight off flu

The best way to prevent the flu is by getting vaccinated every year, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the vaccine for adults and children over six months of age. To find a list of clinics, supermarkets, pharmacies and other vaccine providers in your neighborhood, visit www.flu.gov, click on “Flu Vaccine Finder” and enter your zip code.

If you get the flu, two FDA-approved antiviral drugs—Tamiflu (oseltamivir) and Relenza (zanamivir)—are treatment options recommended by CDC. These prescription drugs can help fight the virus in your body and shorten the time you’re sick. They can also be used to help prevent the flu.

Types of Fraudulent Flu Products

There are no legally marketed over-the-counter (OTC) drugs to prevent or cure the flu. However, there are legal OTC products to reduce fever and to relieve muscle aches, congestion, and other symptoms typically associated with the flu.

NOTE: Never give aspirin or aspirin products to children under that age of 19 for flu or viral No Aspirin Products for Children!infections!

Unapproved drugs (which sometimes are marketed as dietary supplements), conventional foods (such as herbal teas) or devices (such as air filters and light therapies) are fraudulent if they make flu prevention, treatment or cure claims, says Coody, “because they haven’t been evaluated by FDA for these uses.”

On Jan. 25, 2013, FDA and the Federal Trade Commission jointly sent a warning letter to the company that markets “GermBullet,” a nasal inhaler that makes flu prevention and treatment claims. The firm is required to remove the language in its labeling and advertising that violates federal law.

“If the company continues to sell the product without removing the deceptive and illegal language, the firm may be subject to enforcement action, which could include seizure of the products or other legal sanctions,” says FDA Regulatory Counsel Brad Pace, J.D., of FDA’s Health Fraud and Consumer Outreach Branch.

Fraudulent Online Pharmacies

Online pharmacies present an opportunity for Internet scammers to take advantage of unsuspecting consumers. Legitimate online pharmacies do exist, but so do many websites that look like professional and legitimate pharmacies but are actually fraudulent and illegal.

These websites may be selling unapproved antiviral drugs. “Beware of websites that sell generic Tamiflu or Relenza,” says FDA pharmacist Connie Jung, R.Ph., Ph.D., of FDA’s Office of Drug Security, Integrity and Recalls. “Currently there are no FDA-approved generics available for these drugs on the U.S. market.”

“With unapproved products, you really don’t know what you’re getting and can’t be sure of the quality,” adds Jung. “The products could be counterfeit, contaminated, or have the wrong active ingredient or no active ingredient. You could experience a bad reaction, or not receive the drug you need to get better.”

Jung also warns consumers not to be tempted by an online seller that offers much lower prices than typically charged for prescription drugs by your local pharmacy. “Deep discounts on price are a good indicator of a fraudulent, illegal online pharmacy. You should avoid these online sellers because you might get products that are harmful to your health.”

FDA encourages consumers to buy prescription drugs only through an online pharmacy that requires a valid prescription from a doctor or other authorized health care provider and is licensed by the state board of pharmacy (or equivalent state agency) where the patient is located.

Health fraud is pervasive and it’s not always easy to spot a fraudulent product, says Coody. “If you’re tempted to buy an unproven or little known treatment, especially if it’s sold on the Internet, check with your health care provider first.”

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Product Brand Names for Aspirin

aspirintabletAlthough aspirin is an old drug, we often mistakenly take its safety for granted; it can be a dangerous drug, especially for children.

You might be surprised at the number of medications that contain aspirin (salicylates).  To assist you in recognizing some of the medications that contain aspirin, we have provided some lists below.  These are all basic guides, and you must always read the labels.   And, of course, these products are not to be used with children under the age of 19! 

As with most medications, whether they be prescription or over the counter, you want to be careful that you are not ‘double-dosing’  because the recommended dosages are already just below the toxic level to human beings.

Aspirin Brand Names:

  • Acuprin®
  • Anacin® Aspirin Regimen
  • Ascriptin®
  • Aspergum®
  • Aspidrox®medicine_cabinet
  • Aspir-Mox®
  • Aspirtab®
  • Aspir-trin®
  • Bayer® Aspirin
  • Bufferin®
  • Buffex®
  • Easprin®
  • Ecotrin®
  • Empirin®
  • Entaprin®
  • Entercote®
  • Fasprin®
  • Genacote®
  • Gennin-FC®
  • Genprin®
  • Halfprin®
  • Magnaprin®
  • Miniprin®
  • Minitabs®
  • Ridiprin®
  • Sloprin®
  • Uni-Buff®
  • Uni-Tren®
  • Valomag®
  • Zorprin®

Brand names of combination products

  • Alka-Seltzer® (containing Aspirin, Citric Acid, Sodium Bicarbonate)
  • Alka-Seltzer® Extra Strength (containing Aspirin, Citric Acid, Sodium Bicarbonate)
  • Alka-Seltzer® Morning Relief (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Alka-Seltzer® Plus Flu (containing Aspirin, Chlorpheniramine, Dextromethorphan)
  • Alka-Seltzer® PM (containing Aspirin, Diphenhydramine)
  • Alor® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Anacin® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Anacin® Advanced Headache Formula (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Aspircaf® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Axotal® (containing Aspirin, Butalbital)
  • Azdone® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Bayer® Aspirin Plus Calcium (containing Aspirin, Calcium Carbonate)
  • Bayer® Aspirin PM (containing Aspirin, Diphenhydramine)
  • Bayer® Back and Body Pain (containing Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • BC Headache (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • BC Powder (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Damason-P® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Emagrin® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Endodan® (containing Aspirin, Oxycodone)
  • Equagesic® (containing Aspirin, Meprobamate)
  • Excedrin® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Excedrin® Back & Body (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin)
  • Goody’s® Body Pain (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin)
  • Levacet® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Lortab® ASA (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Micrainin® (containing Aspirin, Meprobamate)
  • Momentum® (containing Aspirin, Phenyltoloxamine)
  • Norgesic® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Orphenadrine)
  • Orphengesic® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Orphenadrine)
  • Panasal® (containing Aspirin, Hydrocodone)
  • Percodan® (containing Aspirin, Oxycodone)
  • Robaxisal® (containing Aspirin, Methocarbamol)
  • Roxiprin® (containing Aspirin, Oxycodone)
  • Saleto® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine, Salicylamide)
  • Soma® Compound (containing Aspirin, Carisoprodol)
  • Soma® Compound with Codeine (containing Aspirin, Carisoprodol, Codeine)
  • Supac® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • Synalgos-DC® (containing Aspirin, Caffeine, Dihydrocodeine)
  • Talwin® Compound (containing Aspirin, Pentazocine)
  • Vanquish® (containing Acetaminophen, Aspirin, Caffeine)
  • TIP: It is important to keep a written list of all of any prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements, because many of these contain salicylates, too. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Other Over The Counter Medications that Contain Aspirin:

  • Kaopectate
  • Maalox
  • PamprinNo Aspirin Products for Children!
  • Pepto-Bismol
  • Vanquish
  • Alka-Seltzer
  • Doan’s

For lists of aspirin containing products, both prescription and over the counter, go to the Reye’s Syndrome website by clicking here.

Symptoms of aspirin overdose may include:

  • burning pain in the throat or stomach
  • vomiting
  • decreased urination
  • fever
  • restlessness
  • irritability
  • talking a lot and saying things that do not make sense
  • fear or nervousness
  • dizziness
  • double vision
  • uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body
  • confusion
  • abnormally excited mood
  • hallucination (seeing things or hearing voices that are not there)
  • seizures
  • drowsiness
  • loss of consciousness for a period of time
Symptoms for Reye’s Syndrome include:
Stage I Symptoms Stage II Symptoms Stage III Symptoms Stage IV Symptoms
Persistent or continuous vomiting
Signs of brain dysfunction:
Listlessness
Loss of pep and energy
Drowsiness
Personality changes:
Irritability
Aggressive behavior
Disorientation:
Confusion
Irrational behavior
Combative
Delirium
Convulsions
Coma

NOTE: The symptoms of Reye’s Syndrome in infants do not follow a typical pattern. For example, vomiting may be replaced with diarrhea and infants may display irregular breathing.

Suspect Reye’s in an Infant with:

  • * Diarrhea, but not necessarily vomiting
    * Respiratory disturbances such as hyperventilation or apneic episodes, seizures and hypoglycemia are common
    * Elevated SGOT-SGPT (SAT-ACT) [usually 200 or more units] in the absence of jaundice
Reye’s Syndrome should be suspected in a person if this pattern of symptoms appear during, or most commonly, after a viral illness. Not all of the symptoms have to occur, nor do they have to be displayed in this order. Fever is not usually present. Many diseases have symptoms in common. Physicians and medical staff in emergency rooms who have not had experience in treating Reye’s Syndrome may misdiagnose the disease.
The NRSF has compiled an enormous amount of aspirin information, including non-aspirin products, and aspirin products, in lists in an Android app available in the google play store:  Aspirin Sense and Sensitivity.

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Chickenpox Parties; Just Don’t Do It!

Just Don't Do It!

Just Don’t Do It!

The National Reye’s Syndrome Foundation Does Not Condone Chicken Pox Parties! They can be Deadly!

Sharing body fluids from other children puts your child at great and deadly risk, not to mention this is a Federal Offense according to Homeland Security.

The intentional spreading of any virus, or viral infection, and the mailing or transporting of such, falls under Bio-Terrorism Laws and the FBI and Homeland Security are going to want to talk to those involved. You have no idea what other conditions exist in that swab or sucker. Just don’t do it!

For the sake of your child’s life, and the lives of other children, pregnant women, and Immunocompromised Persons, just don’t do it!

We have seen places on the Internet that offer chickenpox parties, and we know the FBI gets involved. Some people do this as a ‘scam’, charging unsuspecting and uneducated parents more than $100.00 for a swab, or sucker, and parents have no idea what they are really getting. Is that swab or sucker HIV contaminated? Herpes contaminated? Some other disease contaminated? And you are going to risk giving it to your precious child?

Risks of Chicken Pox Parties:

  • * A child will often get 300 to 500 blisters during the infection, but can have up to 1500; these crust over and fall off in one to two weeks.
    * Varicella can be severe and even fatal in otherwise healthy children (but less than 1 out of every 10,000 cases).
    * Chickenpox can cause pneumonia (23 out of every 10,000 cases).
    * Bacterial infections of the blisters (usually impetigo) occur commonly (up to 5% of cases).
    * Chickenpox is an important risk factor for severe invasive group A streptococcal disease, which can be fatal.
    * Other complications of varicella include decreased platelets, arthritis, hepatitis, and brain inflammation.
    * In immunocompromised persons of all ages, varicella may be fatal.
    * The virus which causes chickenpox remains in the body for life and may reappear as shingles, particularly in the elderly.
    * A woman who contracts chickenpox in early pregnancy can pass the virus to her fetus, causing abnormalities in 2% of cases.

Measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella are 4 common childhood diseases caused by measles virus, mumps virus, rubella virus, and varicella virus, respectively. These diseases may be associated with serious complications and, or, death. For example, measles can be associated with pneumonia and encephalitis; mumps can be associated with aseptic meningitis, deafness, and orchitis; rubella occurring during pregnancy can cause congenital rubella syndrome in the infants of infected mothers; and wild-type varicella can be associated with bacterial superinfection, pneumonia, encephalitis, and Reye’s Syndrome.

Chickenpox is a very contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). It causes a blister-like rash, itching, tiredness, and fever. Chickenpox can be serious, especially in babies, adults, and people with weakened immune systems. It spreads easily from infected people to others who have never had chickenpox or received the chickenpox vaccine.

Chickenpox spreads in the air through coughing or sneezing. It can also be spread by touching or breathing in the virus particles that come from chickenpox blisters.

While staph infections of the skin are common in infants and young children, they usually are mild. However, chickenpox blisters can provide a place for staph bacteria to enter the skin, and a serious infection can develop quickly. It’s common for chickenpox blisters to be close together and when the staph infection penetrates the skin, the skin around the infected area simply dies and falls off.

Download our ChickenPox Party Handout

Most children with chickenpox completely recover. But it can be serious, even fatal, for babies, adolescents, and adults.

Signs & Symptoms

Anyone who hasn’t had chickenpox or received the chickenpox vaccine can get the disease. Chickenpox most commonly causes an illness that lasts about 5-10 days.

The classic symptom of chickenpox is a rash that turns into itchy, fluid-filled blisters that eventually turn into scabs. The rash may first show up on the face, chest, and back then spread to the rest of the body, including inside the mouth, eyelids, or genital area. It usually takes about one week for all the blisters to become scabs.

Other typical symptoms that may begin to appear 1-2 days before rash include:
* high fever

* tiredness
* loss of appetite
* headache

Children usually miss 5 to 6 days of school or childcare due to their chickenpox.

NEVER give a child aspirin, or any aspirin containing product who has the chickenpox, or who might be exposed to chicken pox!

Vaccinated Persons:

Some people who have been vaccinated against chickenpox can still get the disease. However, the symptoms are usually milder with fewer blisters and mild or no fever. About 25% to 30% of vaccinated people who get chickenpox will develop illness as serious as chickenpox in unvaccinated persons.

People at Risk for Severe Chickenpox:

Some people who get chickenpox may have more severe symptoms and may be at higher risk for complications. Complications from chickenpox can occur, but they are not as common in otherwise healthy people who get the disease.

People who may have more severe symptoms and may be at high risk for complications include:

* Infants
* Adolescents
* Adults
* Pregnant women
* People with weakened immune systems because of illness or medications; for example,
o People with HIV/AIDS or cancer
o Patients who have had transplants, and
o People on chemotherapy, immunosuppressive medications, or long-term use of steroids.

People at High Risk for Complications:
* Immunocompromised Persons
* People with HIV or AIDS
* Pregnant Women

Immunocompromised Persons

Immunocompromised persons who get varicella are at risk of developing visceral dissemination (VZV infection of internal organs) leading to pneumonia, hepatitis, encephalitis, and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. They can have an atypical varicella rash with more lesions, and they can be sick longer than immunocompetent persons who get varicella. The lesions may continue to erupt for as long as 10 days, may appear on the palms and soles, and may be hemorrhagic.

People with HIV or AIDS

Children with HIV infection tend to have atypical rash with new crops of lesions presenting for weeks or months. HIV-infected children may develop chronic infection in which new lesions appear for more than one month. The lesions may initially be typical maculopapular vesicular lesions but can later develop into non-healing ulcers that become necrotic, crusted, and hyperkeratotic. This is more likely to occur in HIV-infected children with low CD4 counts.

Some studies have found that VZV dissemination to the visceral organs is less common in children with HIV than in other immunocompromised patients with VZV infection. The rate of complications may also be lower in HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy or HIV-infected persons with higher CD4 counts at the time of varicella infection. Retinitis can occur among HIV-infected children and adolescents.

Most adults, including those who are HIV-positive have already had varicella disease and are VZV seropositive. As a result, varicella is relatively uncommon among HIV-infected adults.

Pregnant Women

Pregnant women who get varicella are at risk for serious complications; they are at increased risk for developing pneumonia, and in some cases, may die as a result of varicella.

If a pregnant woman gets varicella in her 1st or early 2nd trimester, her baby has a small risk (0.4 – 2.0 percent) of being born with congenital varicella syndrome. The baby may have scarring on the skin, abnormalities in limbs, brain, and eyes, and low birth weight.

If a woman develops varicella rash from 5 days before to 2 days after delivery, the newborn will be at risk for neonatal varicella. In the absence of treatment, up to 30% of these newborns may develop severe neonatal varicella infection.

Some people should not get chickenpox vaccine or should wait:

* People should not get chickenpox vaccine if they have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a previous dose of chickenpox vaccine or to gelatin or the antibiotic neomycin.
* People who are moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting chickenpox vaccine.
* Pregnant women should wait to get chickenpox vaccine until after they have given birth. Women should not get pregnant for 1 month after getting chickenpox vaccine.
* Some people should check with their doctor about whether they should get chickenpox vaccine, including anyone who:
o Has HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system
o Is being treated with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids, for 2 weeks or longer
o Has any kind of cancer
o Is getting cancer treatment with radiation or drugs
* People who recently had a transfusion or were given other blood products should ask their doctor when they may get chickenpox vaccine.

Ask your health provider for more information.

Treatments at Home for People with Chickenpox

There are several things that can be done at home to help relieve the symptoms and prevent skin infections. Calamine lotion and colloidal oatmeal baths may help relieve some of the itching. Keeping fingernails trimmed short may help prevent skin infections caused by scratching blisters.

Use non-aspirin medications, such as acetaminophen, to relieve fever from chickenpox.

Do not use aspirin or aspirin-containing products to relieve fever from chickenpox. The use of aspirin in children with chickenpox has been associated with Reye’s Syndrome, a severe disease that affects the liver and brain and can cause death.

When to Call the Health Care Provider:

For people with chickenpox at risk of serious complications, call a health care provider if the person:
* is older than 12 years of age

* has a weakened immune system
* is pregnant
* develops any of the following:
o fever that lasts longer than 4 days
o fever that rises above 102°F (38.9°C)
o any areas of the rash or any part of the body becomes very red, warm, or tender, or begins leaking pus (thick, discolored fluid), since these symptoms may indicate a bacterial infection
o extreme illness
o difficult waking up or confused demeanor
o difficulty walking
o stiff neck
o frequent vomiting
o difficulty breathing
o severe cough

Treatments Prescribed by Your Doctor for People with Chickenpox:

Your health care provider can advise you on treatment options. Antiviral medications are recommended for people with chickenpox who are more likely to develop serious disease including:
* otherwise healthy people older than 12 years of age

* people with chronic skin or lung disease
* people receiving steroid therapy
* some groups of pregnant women

Other Sources: CDC | Wikipedia Kids Health.Org |Download our ChickenPox Party Handout

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Other Names For Aspirin

Always check the label, or ask your pharmacist, if a prescription or over the counter drug contains salicylates (aspirin), before giving it to a child under the age of 19.

Here is a list of other names for aspirin (salicylates):other_names_for_aspirin_list

Acetyl Salicylic Acid
Acetylsalicylate
Acetylsalicylic Acid
Aluminum Acetyl Salicylate
Ammonium Salicylate
Amyl Salicylate
Arthropan
Aspirin
Benzyl Salicylate
Butyloctyl Salicylate
Calcium Acetyl Salicylate
Choline Salicylate
Ethyl Salicylate
Lithium Salicylate
Methyl Salicylate
Methylene Disalicylic Acid
Octisalate
Octyl Salicylate
Phenyl Salicylate
Procaine Salicylate
Sal Ethyl Carbonate
Salicylamide
Salicylanilide
Salicylsalicylic Acid
Santalyl Salicylate
Sodium Salicylate
Stoncylate
Strontium Salicylate
Sulfosalicylic Acid
Tridecyl Salicylate
Trolamine Salicylate

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