Category Archives: Salicylate & Chemical Free Sunscreens

Salicylate and Chemical Free Sunscreens

Whatever our skin color, we’re all potentially susceptible to sunburn and other harmful effects of exposure to UV radiation. Although we all need to take precautions to protect our skin, people who need to be especially careful in the sun are those who have

  • pale skin
  • blonde, red, or light brown hair
  • been treated for skin cancer
  • a family member who’s had skin cancer

If you take medicines, ask your health care professional about sun-care precautions; some medications may increase sun sensitivity.

We’ve created a great list of sunscreens that are salicylate (aspirin) and harmful chemical free.  Many use organic ingredients, and we’ve chosen the best of the best.  You can download the list by clicking here.

We caution you to always check the ingredients because manufacturers often make changes! fryday_2013

Please Note:

You’re at the beach, slathered in sunscreen. Your 5-month-old baby is there, too. Should you put sunscreen on her? Not usually, according to Hari Cheryl Sachs, M.D., a pediatrician at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

“The best approach is to keep infants under 6 months out of the sun,” Sachs says, “and to avoid exposure to the sun in the hours between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when ultraviolet (UV) rays are most intense.”

What makes babies so different?

For one thing, babies’ skin is much thinner than that of adults, and it absorbs the active, chemical ingredients in sunscreen more easily.  For another, infants have a high surface-area to body-weight ratio compared to older children and adults.  Both these factors mean that an infant’s exposure to the chemicals in sunscreens is much greater, increasing the risk of allergic reaction or inflammation.

The best protection is to keep your baby in the shade, if possible.  If there is no natural shade, create your own with an umbrella or the canopy of the stroller.

If there’s no way to keep an infant out of the sun, you can apply a small amount of sunscreen-with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15-to small areas such as the cheeks and back of the hands. Test your baby’s sensitivity to sunscreen by first trying a small amount on the inner wrist.

Dress infants in lightweight long pants, long-sleeved shirts, and brimmed hats that shade the neck to prevent sunburn. Tight weaves are better than loose. Keep in mind that while baseball caps are cute, they don’t shade the neck and ears, sensitive areas for a baby.

Summer’s heat presents other challenges for babies.

Younger infants also don’t sweat like we do.  Sweat naturally cools the rest of us down when we’re hot, but babies haven’t yet fully developed that built-in heating-and-cooling system. So you want to make sure your baby doesn’t get overheated.

In the heat, babies are also at greater risk of becoming dehydrated. To make sure they’re adequately hydrated, offer them their usual feeding of breast milk or formula. The water content in both will help keep them well hydrated. A small of amount water in between these feedings is also okay.

For more information, go to:  https://reyessyndrome.wordpress.com/category/kids-and/kids-and-sunscreen/infants/

Other Resource Links:

Effectiveness of Sunscreen Products

Sunscreen: Children and Teens

Other Names for Aspirin

What Is Reye’s Syndrome

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May 24 is Don’t Fry Day!

Sun safety is never out of season. Summer’s arrival means it’s time for picnics, trips to the pool and beach—and a spike in fryday_2013the number of sunburns. But winter skiers and fall hikers should be as wary of the sun’s rays as swimmers. People who work outdoors need to take precautions, too.

The need for sun safety has become clearer over the past 30 years. Studies show that exposure to the sun can cause skin cancer. Harmful rays from the sun—and from sunlamps and tanning beds—may also cause eye problems, weaken your immune system, and give you skin spots, wrinkles, or “leathery” skin.

Sun damage to the body is caused by invisible ultraviolet (UV) radiation. People recognize sunburn as a type of skin damage caused by the sun. Tanning is also a sign of the skin reacting to potentially damaging UV radiation by producing additional pigmentation that provides it with some—but often not enough—protection against sunburn.

To remind everyone to protect their skin and health while enjoying the outdoors, the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention (NCSCP) has designated May 25, 2012 as “Don’t Fry Day.” The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Environmental Protection Agency, advisory members of the council, are helping spread the word on sun safety.

Learn more about sun safety for your family in our Kids and Sunscreen blog area.

Download a free list of salicylate free, and chemical free sunscreens by clicking here.

And remember, never give a child under the age of 19 aspirin or aspirin products for sunburn pain, or for any pain, fever, or illness.  You could trigger a deadly disease known as Reye’s Syndrome.

 

Related Information:

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