Category Archives: Kids and Sunscreen

Salicylate and Chemical Free Sunscreens

Whatever our skin color, we’re all potentially susceptible to sunburn and other harmful effects of exposure to UV radiation. Although we all need to take precautions to protect our skin, people who need to be especially careful in the sun are those who have

  • pale skin
  • blonde, red, or light brown hair
  • been treated for skin cancer
  • a family member who’s had skin cancer

If you take medicines, ask your health care professional about sun-care precautions; some medications may increase sun sensitivity.

We’ve created a great list of sunscreens that are salicylate (aspirin) and harmful chemical free.  Many use organic ingredients, and we’ve chosen the best of the best.  You can download the list by clicking here.

We caution you to always check the ingredients because manufacturers often make changes! fryday_2013

Please Note:

You’re at the beach, slathered in sunscreen. Your 5-month-old baby is there, too. Should you put sunscreen on her? Not usually, according to Hari Cheryl Sachs, M.D., a pediatrician at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

“The best approach is to keep infants under 6 months out of the sun,” Sachs says, “and to avoid exposure to the sun in the hours between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when ultraviolet (UV) rays are most intense.”

What makes babies so different?

For one thing, babies’ skin is much thinner than that of adults, and it absorbs the active, chemical ingredients in sunscreen more easily.  For another, infants have a high surface-area to body-weight ratio compared to older children and adults.  Both these factors mean that an infant’s exposure to the chemicals in sunscreens is much greater, increasing the risk of allergic reaction or inflammation.

The best protection is to keep your baby in the shade, if possible.  If there is no natural shade, create your own with an umbrella or the canopy of the stroller.

If there’s no way to keep an infant out of the sun, you can apply a small amount of sunscreen-with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15-to small areas such as the cheeks and back of the hands. Test your baby’s sensitivity to sunscreen by first trying a small amount on the inner wrist.

Dress infants in lightweight long pants, long-sleeved shirts, and brimmed hats that shade the neck to prevent sunburn. Tight weaves are better than loose. Keep in mind that while baseball caps are cute, they don’t shade the neck and ears, sensitive areas for a baby.

Summer’s heat presents other challenges for babies.

Younger infants also don’t sweat like we do.  Sweat naturally cools the rest of us down when we’re hot, but babies haven’t yet fully developed that built-in heating-and-cooling system. So you want to make sure your baby doesn’t get overheated.

In the heat, babies are also at greater risk of becoming dehydrated. To make sure they’re adequately hydrated, offer them their usual feeding of breast milk or formula. The water content in both will help keep them well hydrated. A small of amount water in between these feedings is also okay.

For more information, go to:  https://reyessyndrome.wordpress.com/category/kids-and/kids-and-sunscreen/infants/

Other Resource Links:

Effectiveness of Sunscreen Products

Sunscreen: Children and Teens

Other Names for Aspirin

What Is Reye’s Syndrome

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May 24 is Don’t Fry Day!

Sun safety is never out of season. Summer’s arrival means it’s time for picnics, trips to the pool and beach—and a spike in fryday_2013the number of sunburns. But winter skiers and fall hikers should be as wary of the sun’s rays as swimmers. People who work outdoors need to take precautions, too.

The need for sun safety has become clearer over the past 30 years. Studies show that exposure to the sun can cause skin cancer. Harmful rays from the sun—and from sunlamps and tanning beds—may also cause eye problems, weaken your immune system, and give you skin spots, wrinkles, or “leathery” skin.

Sun damage to the body is caused by invisible ultraviolet (UV) radiation. People recognize sunburn as a type of skin damage caused by the sun. Tanning is also a sign of the skin reacting to potentially damaging UV radiation by producing additional pigmentation that provides it with some—but often not enough—protection against sunburn.

To remind everyone to protect their skin and health while enjoying the outdoors, the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention (NCSCP) has designated May 25, 2012 as “Don’t Fry Day.” The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Environmental Protection Agency, advisory members of the council, are helping spread the word on sun safety.

Learn more about sun safety for your family in our Kids and Sunscreen blog area.

Download a free list of salicylate free, and chemical free sunscreens by clicking here.

And remember, never give a child under the age of 19 aspirin or aspirin products for sunburn pain, or for any pain, fever, or illness.  You could trigger a deadly disease known as Reye’s Syndrome.

 

Related Information:

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Effectiveness of Sunscreen Products

On June 14, 2011 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced new requirements for sunscreens currently sold over-the-counter (OTC) (i.e. non-prescription). These requirements support the Agency’s ongoing efforts to ensure that sunscreens meet modern-day standards for safety and effectiveness.

sunscreen_broad_spectrumPrior rules on sunscreens dealt almost exclusively with protection against sunburn, which is primarily caused by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation from the sun, and did not address ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation, which contributes to skin cancer and early skin aging. After reviewing the latest science, FDA determined that sufficient data are available to establish a “broad spectrum” test for determining a sunscreen product’s UVA protection. Passing the broad spectrum test shows that the product provides UVA protection that is proportional to its UVB protection.

Sunscreen products that pass the broad spectrum test are allowed to be labeled as “Broad Spectrum.” These “Broad Spectrum” sunscreens protect against both UVA and UVB rays. Scientific data demonstrated that products that are “Broad Spectrum SPF 15 [or higher]” have been shown to reduce the risk of skin cancer and early skin aging when used with other sun protection measures, in addition to helping prevent sunburn. Other sun protection measures include limiting time in the sun and wearing protective clothing.

These measures are necessary, says Lydia Velazquez, PharmD, in FDA’s Division of Nonprescription Regulation Development, because “our scientific understanding has grown. We want consumers to understand that not all sunscreens are created equal.”

“This new information will help consumers know which products offer the best protection from the harmful rays of the sun,” Velazquez says.  “It is important for consumers to read the entire label, both front and back, in order to choose the appropriate sunscreen for their needs.”

Everyone is potentially susceptible to sunburn and the other detrimental effects of exposure to UV radiation.

Products that pass the broad spectrum test will provide protection against both ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) and ultraviolet A radiation (UVA).  Sunburn is primarily caused by UVB.  Both UVB and UVA can cause sunburn, skin cancer, and premature skin aging.  A certain percentage of a broad spectrum product’s total protection is against UVA.

Under the new regulations, sunscreen products that protect against all types of sun-induced skin damage will be labeled “Broad Spectrum” and “SPF 15” (or higher) on the front.

The new labeling will also tell consumers on the back of the product that sunscreens labeled as both “Broad Spectrum” and “SPF 15” (or higher) not only protect against sunburn, but, if used as directed with other sun protection measures, can reduce the risk of skin cancer and early skin aging. For these broad spectrum products, higher SPF (Sun Protection Factor) values also indicate higher levels of overall protection.

By contrast, any sunscreen not labeled as “Broad Spectrum” or that has an SPF value between 2 and 14, has only been shown to help prevent sunburn.

In addition to the final regulations, in June 2011 FDA proposed a regulation that would require sunscreen products that have SPF values higher than 50 to be labeled as “SPF 50+.” FDA does not have adequate data demonstrating that products with SPF values higher than 50 provide additional protection compared to products with SPF values of 50.

FDA also requested data and information on different dosage forms of sunscreen products.  The agency currently considers sunscreens in the form of oils, creams, lotions, gels, butters, pastes, ointments, sticks, and sprays to be eligible for potential inclusion in the OTC sunscreen monograph – meaning that they can be marketed without individual product approvals.

The agency currently considers wipes, towelettes, powders, body washes, and shampoo not eligible for the monograph. Therefore, they cannot be marketed without an approved application.

For sunscreen spray products, the agency requested additional data to establish effectiveness and to determine whether they present a safety concern if inhaled unintentionally.  These requests arose because sprays are applied differently from other sunscreen dosage forms, such as lotions and sticks.

In addition, FDA issued a draft guidance to help sunscreen manufacturers understand how to label and test their products in light of the final and proposed regulations and the data request on dosage forms.

Sun Safety Tips

Spending time in the sun increases the risk of skin cancer and early skin aging.  To reduce this risk, consumers should sun_plus_must_havesregularly use sun protection measures including:

  • Use sunscreens with broad spectrum SPF values of 15 or higher regularly and as directed.
  • Limit time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when the sun’s rays are most intense.
  • Wear clothing to cover skin exposed to the sun; for example, long-sleeved shirts, pants, sunglasses, and broad-brimmed hats.
  • Reapply sunscreen at least every 2 hours, more often if you’re sweating or jumping in and out of the water.
  • Hydrate!  Drink lots of water and good fluids! (Soda products will just make you more thirsty, so try homemade lemonade or iced tea, or just plain water.
  • Wear protective eye ware! Even children should wear real sunglasses with UV protection, not just those play sunglasses.

Located here, are a couple of helpful videos.

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Sunscreen; Children & Teens

Sun safety is never out of season. Summer’s arrival means it’s time for picnics, trips to the pool and beach—and a spike in the number of sunburns. But winter skiers and fall hikers should be as wary of the sun’s rays as swimmers. People who work outdoors need to take precautions, too.

The need for sun safety has become clearer over the past 30 years. Studies show that exposure to the sun can cause skin cancer. Harmful rays from the sun—and from sunlamps and tanning beds—may also cause eye problems, weaken your immune system, and give you skin spots, wrinkles, or “leathery” skin.

Sun damage to the body is caused by invisible ultraviolet (UV) radiation. People recognize sunburn as a type of skin damage caused by the sun. Tanning is also a sign of the skin reacting to potentially damaging UV radiation by producing additional pigmentation that provides it with some—but often not enough—protection against sunburn.

Whatever our skin color, we’re all potentially susceptible to sunburn and other harmful effects of exposure to UV radiation. Although we all need to take precautions to protect our skin, people who need to be especially careful in the sun are those who have

  • pale skin
  • blond, red, or light brown hair
  • been treated for skin cancer
  • a family member who’s had skin cancer

If you take medicines, ask your health care professional about sun-care precautions; some medications may increase sun sensitivity.

Reduce Time in the Sun

It’s important to limit sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when the sun’s rays are strongest. Even on an overcast day, up to 80 percent of the sun’s UV rays can get through the clouds. Stay in the shade as much as possible throughout the day.

Dress with Care

Wear clothes that protect your body. If you plan on being outside on a sunny day, cover as much of your body as smart_sun_sense_childrenpossible. Wear a wide-brimmed hat, long sleeves, and pants. Sun-protective clothing is now available. However, FDA only regulates such products if the manufacturer intends to make a medical claim. Consider using an umbrella for shade.

Be Serious about Sunscreen

Check product labels to make sure you get

  • a “sun protection factor” (SPF) of 15 or more. SPF represents the degree to which a sunscreen can protect the skin from sunburn.
  • “broad spectrum” protection—sunscreen that protects against all types of skin damage caused by sunlight
  • water resistance—sunscreen that stays on your skin longer, even if it gets wet. Reapply water-resistant sunscreens as instructed on the label.

Look For:  Active Ingredients: Zinc Oxide, Titanium Dioxide, Mexoryl SX, or Avobensone(3%)

Look For:  SPF of 15 to 50, depending on your skin tone and the sun’s intensity – being near or in the water, or taking a walk through a wooded park.

Look For:  Lotions, not sprays or powdered formulas – you have more control over coverage.

Look For:  A Water Resistant formula for the beach or swimming pool, or for boating.

Avoid:  Salicylates – Salicylates were first used in cosmetics as Benzyl salicylates. Currently octyl salicylate is the major salicylate component of sunscreen.  Salicylates protect against a small part of the UVB spectrum and must be used in high concentrations. They are aspirin-like substances.

With the increased use of sunscreens it is not surprising that there has been an increase in reports of adverse reactions to sunscreens.

Avoid: Vitamin A (retinyl palmitate) which causes skin cancer in laboratory tests.

Avoid: Oxybensone – a hormone disruptor and skin allergen

Avoid: High SPF’s – it is misleading and offers little additional benefits

Tips for Applying Sunscreen

  • Apply the recommended amount evenly to all uncovered skin, especially your lips, nose, ears, neck, hands, and feet.
  • Apply sunscreen 15 minutes before going out in the sun.
  • If you don’t have much hair, apply sunscreen to the top of your head, or wear a hat.
  • Reapply at least every two hours.
  • Give babies and children extra care in the sun. Ask a health care professional before applying sunscreen to children under 6 months old.
  • Apply sunscreen to children older than 6 months every time they go out.

Protect the Eyes

Sunlight reflecting off snow, sand, or water further increases exposure to UV radiation and increases your risk of developing eye problems.

Tips for eye-related sun safety include:

  • When buying sunglasses, look for a label that specifically offers 99 to 100 percent UV protection.childrens_sunglasses
  • Eye wear should be labeled “sunglasses.” Otherwise, you can’t be sure they will offer enough protection.
  • Pricier sunglasses don’t ensure greater UV protection.
  • Ask an eye care professional to test your sunglasses if you don’t know their level of UV protection.
  • People who wear contact lenses that offer UV protection should still wear sunglasses.
  • Wraparound sunglasses offer the most protection.
  • Children should wear real sunglasses (not toy sunglasses!) that indicate the UV protection level.

Never give a child up to the age of 19 aspirin or aspirin containing products because you could trigger a deadly disease known as Reye’s Syndrome.

Related Information:

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Kids and Sunscreen (Infants)

You’re at the beach, slathered in sunscreen. Your 5-month-old baby is there, too. Should you put sunscreen on her? Not usually, according to Hari Cheryl Sachs, M.D., a pediatrician at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The best approach is to keep infants under 6 months out of the sun,” Sachs says, “and to avoid exposure to the sun in the hours between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when ultraviolet (UV) rays are most intense.”  infants_and_sunscreen

Sunscreens are recommended for children and adults. What makes babies so different?

For one thing, babies’ skin is much thinner than that of adults, and it absorbs the active, chemical ingredients in sunscreen more easily, explains Sachs. For another, infants have a high surface-area to body-weight ratio compared to older children and adults. Both these factors mean that an infant’s exposure to the chemicals in sunscreens is much greater, increasing the risk of allergic reaction or inflammation.

The best protection is to keep your baby in the shade, if possible, Sachs says. If there’s no natural shade, create your own with an umbrella or the canopy of the stroller.

If there’s no way to keep an infant out of the sun, you can apply a small amount of sunscreen—with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15—to small areas such as the cheeks and back of the hands. Sachs suggests testing your baby’s sensitivity to sunscreen by first trying a small amount on the inner wrist.

Cover Up

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) suggests dressing infants in lightweight long pants, long-sleeved shirts, and brimmed hats that shade the neck to prevent sunburn. Tight weaves are better than loose. Keep in mind that while baseball caps are cute, they don’t shade the neck and ears, sensitive areas for a baby.

Summer’s heat presents other challenges for babies.

Younger infants also don’t sweat like we do, Sachs says. Sweat naturally cools the rest of us down when we’re hot, but babies haven’t yet fully developed that built-in heating-and-cooling system. So you want to make sure your baby doesn’t get overheated.

In the heat, babies are also at greater risk of becoming dehydrated. To make sure they’re adequately hydrated, offer them their usual feeding of breast milk or formula, says Sachs. The water content in both will help keep them well hydrated. A small of amount water in between these feedings is also okay.

sun_hat_baby

Make this oh-so-cute Sun Hat for Baby!

Here are some things to keep in mind this summer when outside with infants:

Keep your baby in the shade as much as possible. If you do use a small amount of sunscreen on your baby, don’t assume the child is well protected.

  • Make sure your child wears clothing that covers and protects sensitive skin. Use common sense; if you hold the fabric against your hand and it’s so sheer that you can see through it, it probably doesn’t offer enough protection.
  • Make sure your baby wears a hat that provides sufficient shade at all times.
  • Watch your baby carefully to make sure he or she doesn’t show warning signs of sunburn or dehydration. These include fussiness, redness and excessive crying.
  • Hydrate! Give your baby formula, breast milk, or a small amount of water between feedings if you’re out in the sun for more than a few minutes. Don’t forget to use a cooler to store the liquids.
  • Take note of how much your baby is urinating. If it’s less than usual, it may be a sign of dehydration, and that more fluids are needed until the flow is back to normal.
  • Avoid sunscreens containing the insect repellent DEET on infants, particularly on their hands. Young children may lick their hands or put them in their mouths. According to AAP, DEET should not be used on infants less than 2 months old.
  • If you do notice your baby is becoming sunburned, get out of the sun right away and apply cold compresses to the affected areas.
  • Make sure you talk with your pediatrician, or pharmacist if your baby is taking medications of any kind.  Sun and some Medications can cause bad interactions.
  • Never give an Infant or Child under the age of 19 aspirin, or use aspirin (salicylate) containing products as it could trigger Reye’s Syndrome, a deadly disease.

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