Monthly Archives: June 2013

Pepto Bismol and Children

The Pink Stuff – Harmless or Deadly…

Bismuth Sub-salicylate is a drug used to treat temporary discomforts of the stomach and gastrointestinal tract such as diarrhea, indigestion, heartburn and nausea. Commonly known as pink bismuth, it is the active ingredient in medications such as Pepto-Bismol and Kaopectate.

Bismuth subsalicylate is in a class of medications called antidiarrheal agents. It works by decreasing the flow of fluids and electrolytes into the bowel, reduces inflammation within the intestine, and may kill the organisms that can cause diarrhea.

But, in the gastrointestinal tract, Bismuth Sub-salicylate is converted to salicylic acid (aspirin) and insoluble bismuth harmless_or_deadly_find_outsalts.

There are adverse effects with this drug, most prominently; Reye’s Syndrome. It can also cause a black tongue and black stools in some users of the drug, when it combines with trace amounts of sulfur in saliva and the colon to form bismuth sulfide. Bismuth sulfide is a highly insoluble black salt, and the discoloration seen is temporary and and supposedly harmless.

Children should not take medication with bismuth subsalicylate because epidemiologic evidence points to an association between the use of salicylate-containing medications during viral infections and the onset of Reye’s Syndrome.

Never give a child under the age of 19 any product with aspirin when suffering from flu symptoms or a viral infection, including products like Pepto-Bismol or Kaopectate!

For the same reason, it is recommended that nursing mothers not use medication containing bismuth subsalicylate like Pepto-Bismol because small amounts of the medication are excreted in breast milk and pose a risk of triggering Reye’s Syndrome to nursing children.

pepto_burnedBismuth subsalicylate is the only active ingredient in an over the counter Drug that can leave a shiny metal oxide slag behind after being completely burnt with a blow torch.

 

 

 

Before you, as an adult, take bismuth subsalicylate:
— tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to salicylate pain relievers such as aspirin, choline magnesium trisalicylate, choline salicylate (Arthropan), diflunisal (Dolobid), magnesium salicylate (Doan’s, others), and salsalate (Argesic, Disalcid, Salgesic); or any other medication.

— tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to talk to your doctor or pharmacist about taking bismuth subsalicylate if you take: anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin); a daily aspirin; or medication for diabetes, arthritis or gout.

— if you are taking tetracycline antibiotics such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Doryx, Vibramycin), minocycline (Dynacin, Minocin), and tetracycline (Sumycin), take them at least 1 hour before or 3 hours after taking bismuth subsalicylate.

— ask your doctor before taking this medication if you have ever had an ulcer, bleeding problem, stools that are bloody or blackened, or kidney disease. Also ask your doctor before taking bismuth subsalicylate if you have a fever or mucus in your stool.

We never recommend giving bismuth subsalicylate to a child or teenager, but if you do, be sure to tell the child’s doctor if the child has any of the following symptoms before he or she receives the medication: vomiting, listlessness, drowsiness, confusion, aggression, seizures, yellowing of the skin or eyes, weakness, or flu-like symptoms. Also tell the child’s doctor if the child has not been drinking normally, has had excessive vomiting or diarrhea, or appears dehydrated.

— ask your doctor about taking this medication if you are pregnant or are breast-feeding.pepto_not_for_kids

Brand Names:
Bismusal®
Kaopectate®
Peptic Relief®
Pepto-Bismol®
Pink Bismuth®
Stomach Relief®

You can get a complete list of medications containing bismuth subsalicylate by clicking this link

Please think twice, and read the label warnings, before giving a child under the age of 19 any drugs that contain aspirin, salicylates, or bismuth-subsalicylate! You can get a list of ‘other names for aspirin’ here.

And always remember: Kids and Aspirin Products DON’T Mix!

Related Information:

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Kids and Healthy Swimming

Recreational water illnesses (RWIs) are caused by germs spread by swallowing, breathing in mists or aerosols of, or having contact with contaminated water in swimming pools, hot tubs/spas, interactive fountains, lakes, rivers, or oceans.

RWIs can also be caused by chemicals in the water or chemicals that evaporate from the water and trigger indoor air quality problems. In addition to illnesses, injuries — such as drowning and slips, trips, and falls — can occur in or around the water.

A new CDC study found that swimmers frequently bring poop into the water. This can happen when swimmers do not a_clean_swimming_environmentshower with soap before they start swimming or when they have a diarrheal incident in the pool. Poop might contain germs, which can be swallowed by others in the water and make them sick.

Remember, you share the water you swim in with everyone who enters the pool, and contrary to popular belief, chlorine and other disinfectants do not kill germs instantly. Once germs get into the pool, it can take anywhere from minutes to days for chlorine to kill them. Before they are killed, these germs can cause RWIs, such as gastrointestinal, skin, ear, respiratory, eye, neurologic, and wound infections. The most commonly reported RWI is diarrhea caused by germs such as Crypto (short for Cryptosporidium), Giardia, Shigella, norovirus and E. coli O157:H7. Swallowing just a little water that contains these germs can make you sick.

With the number of RWI outbreaks on the rise, swimmers need to take an active role in helping to protect themselves and prevent the spread of germs. The simple steps below can help you protect yourself and other swimmers from germs in the water you swim in.

Tips for Swimmers
We all share the water we swim in, and we each need to do our part to keep ourselves, our families, and our friends healthy. To help protect yourself and other swimmers from germs, here are a few simple and effective steps all swimmers can take each time we swim:

Keep the poop, germs, and pee out of the water.
Don’t swim when you have diarrhea.
Shower with soap before you start swimming.
Take a rinse shower before you get back into the water.
Take bathroom breaks every 60 minutes.
Wash your hands after using the toilet or changing diapers.

Drowning
Drowning is the leading cause of injury death among children 1–4 years old. Every day, 10 people die from drowning; 2 of those 10 are children under the age of 15 years. Of drowning victims who survive and are treated in emergency departments, more than half are hospitalized or transferred for further care. These individuals often experience brain damage, which can cause memory problems, learning disabilities, or permanent loss of basic functioning (or permanent vegetative state).
dont_use_airfilled_waterwingsTo prevent drowning:
Everyone (adults and children) should know how to swim.
Caregivers should know CPR.
All boaters and weaker swimmers should use lifejackets.
Backyard swimming pools should be separated from the house and yard by a fence with a self-closing and self-latching gate.

Free pool test strips: Go to the Water Quality & Health Council (WQHC)’s Healthy Pools page to order and receive free test strips: http://www.healthypools.org/order-pool-kit-form/

Sunscreen Protection:

Here: https://reyessyndrome.wordpress.com/category/kids-and/kids-and-sunscreen/ is some good sunscreen information – all products are chemical and salicylate free.

And remember: Never give a child aspirin, or aspirin products under the age of 19 for relief of sunburn – you could trigger Reye’s Syndrome – a deadly disease.  Children under the age of 19 should never be given aspirin without a doctor’s orders.

Other Resource Links:

Effectiveness of Sunscreen Products

Sunscreen: Children and Teens

Other Names for Aspirin

What Is Reye’s Syndrome

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